Student Research Symposium Program

Zoom link for entire day: https://fsu.zoom.us/j/96179720048

Note: Once you join the greeters will need to know which breakout room you want to join.

 

Session 1 9:30 a.m. CT - 10:30 a.m. CT

Room 1 - FSU Graduate Education
Session Moderator - Dr. Elizabeth Crowe

Math Strategies: A Case Study of Student Thinking and Teacher Perceptions

Title of presentation: Math Strategies: A Case Study of Student Thinking and Teacher Perceptions 
Presenter: Morgan Durham  
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Graduate 
 
Abstract:
This case study features a fourth and second grade class at an elementary school in Florida. Each class solved a set of math problems representing previously taught concepts. , which included concepts. Student work was analyzed to determine which problem-solving strategies were used and which led to the correct answer. Further, classroom teachers were interviewed to determine their perceptions of student strategy use and whether they would consider the work to be “correct”. Results suggest that most students utilize math strategies taught and modeled by their teachers while some utilized approaches not learned in class. Teachers appear to be flexible in their approach to diverse strategy use but under certain conditions.

Musical Transitions to Accelerate Transition Times During Reading Instruction

Title of presentation: Musical Transitions to Accelerate Transition Times During Reading Instruction 
Presenter: Rachel S. Summerville 
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Graduate 
 
Abstract:
This case study features a first grade class and an intervention designed to decrease activity transition time during reading instruction through the use of a timer coupled with music. To determine the amount of time used for transitions between activities/stations, assessments and measurements of business as usual transition times were conducted through several days of guided observations. Results suggest that as much as twenty minutes per day are spent transitioning during a two hour reading block. After the timer/musical transition intervention was implemented, transition times decreased substantially. These observations suggest that adding a time limit alongside a signal to reinforce and remind students of their time limit greatly decreases the time spent transitioning between tasks and increases student engagement during each task.

Measuring the Effects of High Level Questioning During Science Instruction

Title of presentation: Measuring the Effects of High Level Questioning During Science Instruction
Presenter: Hannah Lee Caskey
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT   

Category: FSU PC Graduate
 
Abstract
This study investigates a first-grade classroom during science instruction and the use of high-level questions to increase science achievement. Students within the class were pairwise randomly assigned to treatment or control. The treatment group received science instruction coupled with high-level questioning and the control group received science instruction that featured low to moderately difficult questions provided by the curriculum. A pretest assessment was administered to evaluate the students’ understanding of states of matter (physical science standards for first grade). Following the pretest, five science lessons were taught to both the treatment and control group with differential levels of questioning based on the levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Students in both conditions were post-tested to determine change in student science achievement after the completion of all lessons. The results from this study demonstrate that while higher-level questions are often prioritized in lesson planning and have been shown to increase student achievement, student responses to high-level questions and growth in science achievement may depend on their level of achievement.

Personalized Behavioral Interventions in Elementary School

Title of presentation: Personalized Behavioral Interventions in Elementary School
Presenter: Ivy S. McDonald
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT   

Category: FSU PC Graduate

Abstract
This case study features a personalized kindergarten behavioral intervention plan that was formulated by linking a student’s dispositional characteristics to theories of learning and behavior. To begin, student observations were conducted to measure existing and persistent undesirable behaviors. During observations, external factors related to these behaviors were noted and analyzed. Based on these data, five unproductive classroom behaviors were identified along with a notable student characteristic of extrinsic motivation. A personalized, daily behavior chart was constructed that assigned point values to positive classroom behaviors to be performed during each subject area time block. Point goals were established and linked to extrinsic rewards. Growth from pre to post (increased percentage of points earned each day) suggests that the student can successfully participate in productive classroom behaviors with a personalized intervention, but traditional classroom management techniques alone do not influence the student to perform these actions.

 

Room 2- FSU Undergraduate Psychology
Session Moderator - Dr. Tyler Towne

Negative Effects of Hookup Culture on Self Esteem

Title of presentation: Negative Effects of Hookup Culture on Self Esteem
Presenter: Sydney E. Burns
Advisor: Dr. Tyler Towne
Location: Room 2
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Psychology
 
Abstract
This research aimed to study the relationship between sexual hookup culture and self-esteem in adults. Participants were administered a survey to measure the positive or negative effects and experiences of hookup culture in their own lives and in the lives of their peers. Female participants indicated an overall lower self-esteem on average than male participants as it relates to hookups and hookup culture. It was also found that a large percentage of participants overestimated the sexual permissibility of their peers. There was a limited sample size of males in the study and pre-existing conditions that may negatively affect self-esteem were not controlled. 

Effect of Hookup Culture on Self Esteem mp4

Priming & Memory: Writing utensil effects of word lists retention

Title of presentation: Priming & Memory: Writing utensil effects of word lists retention
Presenter: Hannah A. Brown
Advisor: Dr. Tyler Towne
Location: Room 2
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Psychology

 Abstract:

These studies were designed to investigate the difference in memory recall & recognition between a permanent writing tool and something erasable, like a pencil. In the interest of the study, participants were introduced to a set of stimuli, then a separate task to distract them from fixating on the stimuli. This was tested in order to determine how much of the stimuli could be recalled between the two types of writing instruments: pen and pencil. The concluding results showed no significant difference in the number of words remembered with using pen vs. pencil. There was also no significant difference in false positives in words remembered in contrast to pen vs. pencil. However, in an analysis, it proved that there was a significant difference in those who performed over zoom than those in-person. The second study involved the same pretenses, expect the participants were given another stimuli which involved the words the participants had written down, and some they had not in order to recognize the words. The results showed no significant difference. 

Priming & Memory pdf

Efficacy of Online Education in Grade School 

Title of presentation: Efficacy of Online Education in Grade School 
Presenter: Benjamin Earnest
Advisor: Dr. Tyler Towne
Location: Room 2
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Psychology
 
Abstract
In this study I examined learning outcome differences between two groups of 6-8 grade students who were given either a face-to-face (FTF) or distance learning (DL) lesson and corresponding quiz. I hypothesized that students in the FTF environment would perform better than those in the DL environment. However, I found that the students in the DL environment performed slightly better. Along with investigating the efficacy of DL, I surveyed the students on their use of technology in an education setting and found that students who rated their use of technology as more frequent performed significantly better than those that rated their use of technology as lower.

Efficacy of Online Education in Grade School mp4

Memory Recognition of Words and Pictures

Title of presentation: Memory Recognition of Words and Pictures
Presenter: Sophia Benopoulos
Advisor: Dr. Tyler Towne
Location: Room 2
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Psychology

Abstract
FSU PC Student Research Symposium - In this research project I studied the difference in recognition between words and pictures. Eighteen participants were exposed to a stimuli set containing pictures and words presented at one per second. Participants were tested to determine how much of the stimuli could be recognized amongst a set of lures. The number of correctly recognized words and pictures were compared to determine if there was a difference in recognition rates between pictures and words when controlling for response bias. My hypothesis that pictures would have higher rates of recognition than words was confirmed. There was a significant difference between groups showing that pictures indeed had higher recognition rates than words did. 

Memory Recognition of Words and Pictures mp4

Room 3 - FSU Undergraduate Engineering
Session Moderator - Dr. Ali Manzak

Clean Energy Deer Repellent (CEDR)

Title of presentation: Clean Energy Deer Repellent (CEDR)
Presenter: Jeffery Williams, Morgan McVay, Alex Bernstein
Advisor: Dr. Ali Manzak
Location: Room 3
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Electrical & Computer Engineering

 Abstract: High Frequency Deer Deterrent is a device that will be used to detect and deter deer from crossing into the path of oncoming traffic. The definition of a deer related collision occurs when one or more deer and a human-operated vehicle collide on a roadway and it can result in deer fatality, property damage, and human injury or death. In the United States an estimated 1.2 million deer related accidents occurred in a one-year period ending in June 2012 with at least 200 human casualties, and in both property damage and reduction methods, the U.S. spent around four billion dollars in the mid-2000s.  Given the expansion of housing developments, the number of these collisions will only continue to rise. The use of deer crossing road signs have been around for decades on the side of the roadways, but with the number of accidents and fatalities still on the rise, this solution seems to be ineffective.
This device will use computer vision to be able identify not only deer but other animals such as a dog, cat, racoon, etc. and then trigger a high frequency, but safe, sound wave that will deter the animal from the side of the road. The device will be powered by solar energy and will be able to transmit results via radio frequency so that it can be monitored from a remote location.

CEDR Presentation pdf
CEDR Poster pdf

AI Robot Vehicle

Title of presentation: AI Robot Vehicle
Presenter: Annette Mowry, Ryan Jones, Dustin Marsden, Milankumar Patel
Advisor: Dr. Ali Manzak
Location: Room 3
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Electrical & Computer Engineering

 Abstract
Robots are being used in many applications in home and industry today. With increased Artificial Intelligence (AI) capability, it will be essential part of our daily life in the near future. In this project, a typical line tracking vehicle (robot) is designed to solve a maze. Then AI capability is included to improve the success rate of the robotic vehicle by reducing number of trials. The vehicle follows a path, stores the information taken from the path and then uses this information to optimize the solution. The interconnection device utilized is the Raspberry Pi which stores the algorithm and controls all the peripherals. We will also utilize up to 7 Infrared sensors to get an accurate reading of the line. The data obtained from the sensors are sent in real-time to the Raspberry Pi, and the solution path is stored and used to simplify the solution. For instance, solving a maze with 14 turns could be simplified into only 2 turns.

AI Robot Vehicle mp4
AI Robot Vehicle pdf

OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Prototype

Title of presentation: OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Prototype
Presenter: Sean M. Smith and Justin S. Humphrey
Advisor: Dr. Ali Manzak
Location: Room 3
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Electrical & Computer Engineering

 Abstract
Alternative forms of energy production other than the use of fossil fuels are on the rise at a global scale. Examples of alternative forms of energy production are solar, wind, and hydroelectric processes. There is another process called OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) that uses temperature differences (gradients) of ocean water at different depths to produce energy. Although OTEC is a promising form of energy production, little progress has been made in the commercial production of it. The purpose of this project is to bring some attention to this interesting form of alternative energy and see if a smaller, portable OTEC unit could be designed for personal application. The following will discuss the design challenges of a small-scale OTEC prototype, including energy/cost analysis, and feasibility issues.

OTEC Prototype mp4

The Mobile Equipment and Materials Escort (MEME) - A semi-autonomous mobile work platform

Title of presentation: The Mobile Equipment and Materials Escort - A semi-autonomous mobile work platform
Presenter: Raymond A Bennett, Calen Sims, Raneem Salman
Advisor: Dr. Ali Manzak
Location: Room 3
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU Undergraduate Electrical & Computer Engineering

Abstract
With an increase in industrialization dominating the modern era, the mechanization of the workforce has become a progressively prominent feature of the contemporary working environment. Menial tasks often executed by blue-collar workers have been replaced with the mechanical performance of pseudo-intelligent apparatus that not only create a more efficient and durable system but also increase regulation and facilitate a more effective work environment. Ultimately, these machines are implemented to bolster productivity in the working environment, and to relieve the physical restrictions associated with human performance and capacity.

This project presents the design and plan of a mechanical transportation prototype with semi-autonomous features to be implemented in an industrial environment. The platform aims to implement autonomous navigation, to allow for the user to both guide and ping the platform as it carries a large load and navigates the workspace. As a result, larger cargo can be transported in a timely manner while reducing physical strain on workers, surpassing the limits of human capacity and increasing the efficiency of the workspace. Relying on a combination of sensors for communication and navigation, the platform includes ultrasonic and infrared sensors to produce a system that provides both autonomous and manually controlled services. A combination of infrared and ultrasonic sensors, as well as manual control by way of Bluetooth, are implemented to allow the user to guide the platform at their own personal discretion.

MEME Presentation pdf

Session 2 10:30 a.m. CT - 11:30 a.m. CT

Room 1- FSU Graduate/Undergraduate Education
Session Moderator - Dr. Elizabeth Crowe

Verbal Praise as an Antecedent for Behavior Modification

Title of presentation: Verbal Praise as an Antecedent for Behavior Modification
Presenter: Amber Nations Corum
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT   

Category: FSU PC Graduate

Abstract
This case study features a third grade student who struggles with off task behaviors in instructional settings. While behavioral goals and improvement plans were established early in the school year, the student continues to struggle with desired behaviors and appropriate responses to peers and teachers. The goal of this study is to determine the effect of using rewards as the antecedent to desired behaviors rather than a result of desired behaviors. To measure the effect of this approach, first, behavioral data before implementation was recorded. Then, the antecedent reward plan was initiated and data to measure behaviors during treatment continued in the same manner. Results of both positive behavioral approaches will be discussed and explained along with results from the control and treatment conditions.

ESE Students and Reading Instruction - Is There a Difference Between Small Group or Whole Group?

Title of presentation: ESE Students and Reading Instruction - Is There a Difference Between Small Group or Whole Group?
Presenter: Lacey Vandel
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT   

Category: FSU PC Graduate

Abstract
This study features fourth grade ESE (Exceptional Student Education) learners and how their reading comprehension gains depended on the grouping strategy employed by the teacher. To begin with, pre-assessments were administered on a target comprehension skill. Following the pre-test, two lessons were taught to the group of students via small-group reading instruction followed by post-tests. Next, the same group of students participated in pre-tests, whole group lessons, and post-testing on another target comprehension skill. Results suggest that while student pretests were not significantly different on either reading comprehension skill, the observed growth for whole-class instruction was greater than student growth after small group instructions. Implications and limitations will be discussed.

Determining Correlations Between Various Mathematical Essential Understandings

Title of presentation: Determining Correlations Between Various Mathematical Essential Understandings
Presenter: Emily R Hawkinson
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT   

Category: FSU PC Graduate

Abstract
This correlational study features MAP (Measure of Academic Progress) assessment data from a second grade inclusive class that has been analyzed to determine the strength in relationships between various mathematical skill sets, such as those for geometry, numbers and operations, and operations for algebraic thinking. To begin, individual student subtest scores as well as overall math scores were gathered from the NWEA (Northwest Evaluation Association) database and placed into a spreadsheet so that correlations could be computed. Correlation results suggest that there is a greater relationship between skills necessary for geometry and numbers and operations than with geometry and operations for algebraic thinking or numbers and operations and operations for algebraic thinking.

How Are You Feeling? An exploration of the relation between student perceptions and academic achievement.

Title of presentation: How Are You Feeling? An exploration of the relation between student perceptions and academic achievement.
Presenter: Jeremy Scott Brannon
Advisor: Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate

Abstract
This study focuses on the state of fourth graders' self-esteem, how they feel about their relationship with their teacher, their overall attitude about school, and how it correlates with their reading and math achievement. To begin this study, students were given likert-scale surveys focusing on three elements; self-esteem, the student/teacher relationship, and their attitudes towards school. Once surveys were completed and analyzed, students' MAP scores were utilized to detect correlations between their perceptions of self esteem, teacher relationships, and attitudes toward school and their achievement levels. Initial analysis suggests there are concerning low levels of student self-esteem among fourth graders but restively positive perceptions of schools and teachers. In addition, significant positive correlations exist between fourth grade perceptions of self and school and math achievement.

Room 2 - GCSC Research/FSU Undergraduate Communication
Session Moderator - Dr. Laurie Lawrence

How Technology Improves Food Insecurity

Title of presentation: How Technology Improves Food Insecurity
Presenter: Julianna Keenan
Advisor: Dr. Laurie Lawrence
Location: Room 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT  

Category: GCSC Research
 
Abstract:
This project highlights the importance of transitioning to precision agriculture and how it will decrease food insecurity. There is also a focus on why more programs that aim to teach people how to use technology that is required to make precision agriculture possible should exist. Drones and sensors are the main technological focus of this project because of their many uses and ease of operation.

How Technology Improves Food Insecurity pdf

Molecules That Changed the Course of History

Title of presentation: Molecules That Changed the Course of History
Presenter: Nabila Patel
Advisor: Dr. Jessica Edwards
Location: Room 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT  

Category: GCSC Research

Abstract: Over the course of history, the chemical properties of compounds have played pivotal roles in shaping the modern world. As the chemical properties that comprise everything in the universe are arguably invisible to the eye, the tremendous effects they have had—and continue to have—on human civilization are vastly unrecognized. After reading Napoleon’s Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History by Jay Burreson and Penny Le Couteur, three molecules of interest were chosen for further research: Vitamin C, pepper, and cellulose. Vitamin C proved to be a matter of life or death for thousands in the 16th century; pepper proved to have unexpectedly immense effects on world trade, exploration, and colonization; and cellulose, a surprisingly versatile molecule, lead to both literal and figurative explosions in the firearms and entertainment industries. In this presentation, I explore some of the chemical and physical properties of these molecules and how their discovery has shaped human civilization and the world we live in today.

Molecules That Changed the Course of History pdf
Molecules That Changed The Course of History mp4

Three molecules and their origins and effects on society

Title of presentation: Three molecules and their origins and effects on society
Presenter: Zainab R. Ahmad
Advisor: Dr. Jessica Edwards
Location: Room 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT  

Category: GCSC Research

Abstract: In this project, I explored the chemistry of three molecules, their discovery, and effects on society. The molecules were chosen after reading “Napoleon's buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History ” by Jay Burreson and Penny Le Couteur. There are many molecules discovered through the years that have changed history and stimulated advancements in medicine, research, and production. The three molecules I will be discussing are silk molecules, dye molecules, and isoprene (or rubber) molecules. I will be discussing their discovery and development, their chemical and physical properties, and the mechanisms by which they spread across different industries and various parts of the world. Their impacts on society and contributions to the advancement of civilization will also be discussed.

Three molecules and their origins and effects on society pdf
Three molecules and their origins and effects on society mp4

Departmental Collaboration within the Hospitality Industry: A Method of Human Trafficking Identification

Title of presentation: Departmental Collaboration within the Hospitality Industry: A Method of Human Trafficking Identification
Presenter: Mason Taylor and Brandon Suitt
Advisor: Dr. Laurie Lawrence
Location: Room 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Professional Communication
 
Abstract:
This is an exhibition of potential research designed to assess whether in-house resources, for employees in the hospitality industry, would assist in the identification of human trafficking. The research will focus on the development of a computer program that can be utilized for collaboration by all departments to flag potential suspicious activity related to human trafficking. Currently, the research team could not identify a program being utilized and discovered a gap between internal communication and victim identification. 

A Method of Human Trafficking Identification https
 

Room 3 - High School AP Research
Session Moderator - Dr. Karen Works & Professor Joy Saddler

Protein Concentrations in Cows' Milk from the Four Stages of Lactation

Title of presentation: Protein Concentrations in Cows' Milk from the Four Stages of Lactation
Presenter: Madeleine G Wilson
Advisor: Robin Vaughn
Location: Room 3
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT

Category: High School AP Research

Abstract
The purpose of this research experiment was to analyze the relationship between the protein concentration of milk and the stage of lactation in which it was produced. A certified dairy farmer collected milk samples from a Jersey cow for each of the four stages of lactation, and a spectrometer was used to measure the total protein concentration of the milk as well as the concentrations of the constituent casein and whey proteins. The total protein concentration and casein concentration both declined from the first stage of lactation to the fourth stage while the whey protein experienced a slight increase in concentration. The results of the experiment are significant because they may pose implications for people suffering from lactose intolerance. Multiple studies have confirmed that undigested whey protein is responsible for the symptoms associated with lactose intolerance, so the relatively low concentration of whey and high concentration of casein in the first stage of lactation may reduce the severity of the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

Protein Concentrations in Cows' Milk pdf

The Relationship Between Religious Beliefs and Political Views

Title of presentation: The Relationship Between Religious Beliefs and Political Views
Presenter: Samuel D. Dunyak
Advisor: Robin Vaughn
Location: Room 3
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT

Category: High School AP Research

Abstract
The work I will be presenting is data I have obtained through my experiment, and the analysis of such data. It was obtained through the completion of a survey asking individuals about their personal religious beliefs and political views.

Prosody changes and the extent of its impact on memory retention in students

Title of presentation: Prosody changes and the extent of its impact on memory retention in students
Presenter: Kai A Thurman
Advisor: Robin Vaughn
Location: Room 3
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT

Category: High School AP Research

Abstract: I will be presenting my proposal, testing how prosody changes in certain age groups (specifically primary school classifications such as elementary, middle, and high school). Additionally, I will test how certain recording types affect memorization levels in the aforementioned students. As of right now, in my AP Research, I have accumulated data and analyzed it, but not to the point of completion, so I will be exhibiting said data. Said information is two-fold. This data includes simple graphs of correct/incorrect answers. The above info delves also more into averages, and proportions of answer types, so a cross-analysis of data in this test will be portrayed. Research sources will also be discussed. In summation, this research, thus far, will be overviewed.

Memory Retention Presentation pdf

To what extent does teacher stress impact the learning environment?

Title of presentation: To what extent does teacher stress impact the learning environment?
Presenter: Katelynn M. Turney-Rudisill
Advisor: Robin Vaughn
Location: Room 3
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. CT

Category: High School AP Research

Abstract
I will be proposing my research project for the year in our school’s AP Research class. This study focuses on primarily the interaction between students and educators, and how stressors inside and outside the school environment affect educators. Alongside this, the effects these stressors have on teaching will be studied. As of right now in my research, I have compiled data and analyzed it, but do not have a concise statement for how my study has gone. Therefore, this will exhibit the data which I have collected. I will show what trends the data points to, and what can be made from the previously mentioned data. Research limitations will be explained and discussed, and further implications can be discussed for the future of this research project.

Teacher Stress Impact on Learning pdf

 

Break 11:30 - Noon CT

Session 3 Noon CT - 1:00 p.m. CT

ROOM 1- FSU GRADUATE SYSTEMS ENGINEERINGS & PSYCHOLOGY/UNDERGRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY
SESSION MODERATOR - DR. LEAH KOEHLER

Post-COVID-19 Workspace Design

Title of presentation: Post-COVID-19 Workspace Design
Presenter: Everett J. Tyndall
Advisor: Dr. David Gross
Location: Room 1
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Graduate Systems Engineering
 
Abstract
The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has shown the world that current workplace design standards are highly conducive to spreading dangerous respiratory diseases. As such, protective measures are needed to protect personnel while still providing productive and efficient work environments. Mitigations outlined in this research include air purifying systems, custom designed office layouts, and one time use materials for commonly used equipment. 

Workspace Design pdf
Workspace Design mp4

Journaling for Stress Management: A Self-Management Project

Title of presentation: Journaling for Stress Management: A Self-Management Project
Presenter: Madison Sketoe
Advisor: Dr. Leah Koehler
Location: Room 1
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Graduate Psychology

Abstract
The American Psychological Association found that more than 75% of American adults reported experiencing emotional and physical symptoms of stress (2019). This self-management project examines the occurrences of daily journaling and its effects on an undergraduate student’s stress management. Expressive writing has been found to reduce negative thoughts so that space for cognitive resources is spent on positive features, like stress management and not wasted on harmful thinking (Klein & Boals, 2001). During the reversal phase of this project functional control was demonstrated. The heart rate and stress levels recorded mirror the participant’s weekly circumstances as stress levels were more severe during hectic occurrences that college students face such as: standardized tests, extracurricular activities, and fulfilling graduate school applications. The purpose of this self-management project was to achieve effective stress relief by writing a journal entry of at least 500 words daily.

Self-Management Poster pdf
Self-Management mp4

Community Data Initiative: Box Turtles

Title of presentation: Community Data Initiative: Box Turtles
Presenter: Marwa N. Abdelkader
Advisor: Dr. Leah Koehler
Location: Room 1
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Graduate Psychology

 Abstract
Currently, there is minimal research to engage members of the community to be involved in data collection. Traditional research standards encourage investigation of questions in which all variables can be controlled or influenced by investigators. By not conforming to these research values, broader contextual variables and new research questions can be studied at a community level (Fawcett, 1991). This study is a community-level initiative to engage members of three local neighborhoods to be involved in data collection on neighborhood box turtle sightings to aid local wildlife biologists in gaining information on species prevalence and conservation. We plan to examine the effectiveness of brochures, magnets, and social media platforms by systematically staggering these interventions across neighborhoods utilizing a multi-baseline design. Baseline data show an increase in data collection in one neighborhood without the introduction of a formal interventi on and steady levels of data collection in the other neighborhoods. The first phase, a brochure delivered to all addresses in the first neighborhood, will be initiated this spring (March/April). Sustained data collection by community members will aid in a larger demographic data collection initiative on the local box turtle population.

Turtle Poster pdf

Stress and the Hippocampus: A Review

Title of presentation: Stress and the Hippocampus: A Review
Presenter: Amanda Hadaway
Advisor: Dr. Tyler Towne
Location: Room 1
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Psychology

Abstract
The behavioral effects of stress are readily known. However, the neurological changes associated in the hippocampus are not well understood. In this review I summarize over twenty-five years of research and examine the effects of chronic restraint stress on the CA3 and the dentate gyrus hippocampal regions. The findings suggest that the elevated glucocorticoids lead to differential synaptic protein expression that causes molecular reorganization along the synaptic membrane. Furthermore, the expression of GABAergic interneurons is suppressed leading to excessive glutamate release which is correlated with dendritic atrophy. These morphological and molecular changes have been implicated in spatial memory and long-term potentiation deficits. Earlier studies focused on post synaptic changes. As the presynaptic molecular changes become readily understood, the treatment options for stress related psychiatric disorders becomes more efficacious.

Stress and the Hippocampus mp4

Room 2 - FSU Undergraduate Education
Session Moderator - Dr. Elizabeth Crowe

Developing Letter/Sound Recognition and Blending Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learner

Title of presentation: Developing Letter/Sound Recognition and Blending Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learner
Presenter: Hannah R Cummings
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education
 
Abstract
This case study features a kindergarten ESL (English as a Second Language) student who is also a struggling reader. To begin with, an assessment was administered to determine the nature of literacy skills possessed by the student. The results of the skill assessment suggested that the ESL student along with the struggling reader demonstrated varying reading skill profiles that contrast those typically observed among native English-speakers and on grade level readers. The student possesses some basic knowledge of letters and letter sounds along with word reading but continues to struggle with blending and fluency. These missing skills pose challenges to their reading success and therefore these skills (letter recognition/letter sounds and blending) were targeted for intervention within a three three-lesson series. Changes from pre to post-test suggest that ESL students can acquire word reading skills via individualized and explicit instruction although specific accommodations for language building and support are necessary for the ESL Learner.

Developing Knowledge of Short Vowel Sounds in English and as Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Developing Knowledge of Short Vowel Sounds in English and as Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Danielle C Nelson
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features a fourth-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) student who struggles to read. Initial investigations began with observations and literacy skill assessments to determine strengths and weaknesses. Preliminary results suggest that although he is nearly 10 years old, he is reading at an English proficiency level of a 6-year-old. However, the student possesses strong oral communication skills in contrast to his independent reading skills. A series of individualized intervention lessons to teach and practice short vowel sounds were planned and delivered with pre and post-tests administered to measure skill growth. Results suggest that instruction that takes into account the language needs of ESL students can result in positive literacy gains, even for older second language learners.

Using Syllable Improve Decoding - an Examination of ESL Reading Growth

Title of presentation: Using Syllable Improve Decoding - an Examination of ESL Reading Growth
Presenter: Michaela L Cassidy
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features a fifth-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) who struggles to read multisyllabic words. After initial assessments, results suggest that the student lacked knowledge of open, closed, and silent e syllables. Given that the student is struggling to read in 5th grade, an intervention to address multisyllabic decoding was created to increase decoding skills and fluency. Changes from pre to post-test suggest this strategy increased word reading skills and fluency with text while also taking language needs into consideration. The results of this individualized intervention demonstrate the usefulness of explicit instruction with ESL students as an effective means of teaching language and literacy skills.

Developing One Syllable Word Recognition in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Developing One Syllable Word Recognition in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Melanie L Spradley
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features a fifth-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) literacy skills analysis and an intervention sequence designed to address reading skill deficits via individualized, explicit instruction. To begin with, assessments were administered, such as the MAP and the DAR to determine the nature of literacy skills possessed by the student and results revealed that knowledge of short vowels was the skill of most concern. Skill profile results suggest that ESL students struggle to decoding and read words without explicit instruction. A pre-test was administered to determine that the vowels a and o were more easily decodable in words than the vowels e, i, and u. Post test results suggest that decoding skills can be learned by ESL students when language needs are taken into account.

Room 3 - FSU Undergraduate Computer Science/Mechanical Engineering
Session Moderator - Dr. Yvonne Traynham

Impact of Topical Inhibitors on Corrosion Rates for ASTM A569 Steel

Title of presentation: Impact of Topical Inhibitors on Corrosion Rates for ASTM A569 Steel
Presenter: Colin R. Jones
Advisor: Dr. Yvonne Traynham
Location: Room 3
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering
 
Abstract
Corrosion, a destructive phenomenon occurring in metals, is detrimental to the usability and service life of affected materials. A metal’s susceptibility to corrosion can be decreased or prevented through various measures, including the application of corrosion inhibitors. Three corrosion inhibitors, H&M CB4, CRC 6026, and CorrosionX, were selected to be analyzed based on consumer reception and reported success. The effectiveness of these inhibitors was assessed through corrosion rate calculations performed on five ASTM A569, plain, low carbon steel specimens. Two untreated specimens, identified as 220 CTRL and CTRL, were held as experimental controls, and yielded average corrosion rates of 3.70 and 3.93 mm/year, respectively. Treated specimens, identified as CB, CRC, and CX, produced average corrosion rates of 3.65, 4.52, and 3.50 mm/year, respectively. The application of corrosion inhibitors in this experiment was ineffective at reducing the corrosion rates of the ASTM A569 specimens, as average corrosion rates were comparable between treated and untreated specimens. Although the experiment was successful in producing expected corrosion rate consistency, evaluating corrosion rates of a specific inhibitor applied to multiple specimens would be more successful in exhibiting corrosion’s non-linearity and determining the effectiveness of the inhibitor. An additional experimental concern was the repeated subjection of the specimens to abrasion, which potentially removed inhibitive coatings and rendered the treatments useless, skewing the results. 

ASTM A569 Steel pdf

How FDM 3D Printing Orientations Affects the Strength of Printed Specimens

Title of presentation: How FDM 3D Printing Orientations Affects the Strength of Printed Specimens
Presenter: Avary Potts
Advisor: Dr. Yvonne Traynham
Location: Room 3
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering

Abstract:
Mechanical properties of materials are how the material will behave with respect to a load/force. Mechanical properties are important for picking materials for a system with anticipated loads. There are many methods of changing the properties/shape of materials, this report looks at a division of additive manufacturing (specifically Fused Deposition Modelling) and how print orientations affect the tensile properties of Polylactic Acid (PLA). Using ASTM standard D 638-03 for the testing procedure to calculate the actual tensile properties of PLA and comparing that to the specified theoretical properties for evaluation. It was found that the 0-degree orientation had a stress of 14.44 MPa at 40% in-fill, compared to the 90-degree specimen that had a stress of 8.17 MPa at the same in-fill. Overall, the 0-degree specimens performed best, but had a lower modulus of elasticities, and the 90-degree specimens performed as well or better at high infills such as 80-100%. Only one 45-degree specimen was tested, and it performed the worst, reaching a stress of 5.53 MPa at 20% in-fill. Some possible errors included my measurements, printing defects, my calculations, and using a cylindrical chuck in the tension tester. The purpose of this test was successful in showing print orientation is an important design factor for anticipated load in FDM manufacturing. 

3D Printing pdf

Efficiently Automating Chemical Nanofilm Imaging Extractions

Title of presentation: Efficiently Automating Chemical Nanofilm Imaging Extractions
Presenter: Wendy L. Slattery
Advisor: Dr. Karen Works, Computer Science, FSU and Dr. Martin McPhail, Chemistry, UWG
Location: Room 3
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Computer Science

Abstract
The use of nanotechnology has significantly advanced applied chemical research. This has driven the need for novel nanofilm image processing techniques able to quantify and detect variations occurring at the molecular scale.  Specifically, researchers are often required to manually extract film features from the image background, a tedious and laborious process.  We demonstrate an automated application that applies methods to address the translucent, low contrast, discontinuous edges, and the kinetic nature of these self-assembled nanofilms within a time-series and to calculate surface area and layer depths within a nominal degree of error.  In addition, to decrease the application processing time we have explored incorporating artificial intelligence algorithms in a semi-supervised learning environment to limit the number of pixels that must be processed on each image.

Efficiently Automating Chemical Nanofilm Imaging Extractions pdf

Effect of current events on overall sentiment of consumer reviews

Title of presentation: Effect of current events on overall sentiment of consumer reviews
Presenter: Rebecca Carroll
Advisor: Dr. Karen Works
Location: Room 3
Time: Noon - 1:00 p.m. CT 

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Computer Science

Abstract
Using classification techniques in sentiment analysis provided by library neural networks the level of positivity (and thus also the negativity) of a text can be quantified. This, coupled with already quantitative review systems (such as star ratings), provides an objective viewpoint into the broad stroke sentiment of thousands, or hundreds of thousands of reviews. Our goal is to use publicly available review data from two years and position the events of that time period against the sentiment of user reviews to determine how consumer review behavior is driven by the context of the current event occurring at the time period of the review. Details on the challenges encountered when approaching this problem will be provided.

 

Session 4 1:00 p.m. CT - 2:00 p.m. CT

Room 1- FSU Undergraduate Education
Session Moderator - Dr. Karen Works & Professor Joy Saddler

Developing Decoding and Encoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Developing Decoding and Encoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Madison B. Wilson
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education
 
Abstract
This case study features a third grade ESL (English as a Second Language) student who is learning to English language and literacy skills. First, the student’s skills were analyzed and results suggest that the student possessed basic decoding skills while lacking the ability to decode and encode certain short vowels, vowel digraphs, and the rule of silent E. These missing skills pose challenges to the student’s reading success and therefore these skills (Short vowel O/E, vowel digraph AI, and silent E) were targeted for intervention by administering three different lesson plans. The differences between pre to post tests reveal changes in vowel knowledge and improved word reading and fluency. 

Developing Decoding and Encoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners pdf
Developing Decoding and Encoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners mp4

Developing Multisyllabic Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Developing Multisyllabic Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Abbie E. Palo
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features a literary skills analysis of a fourth-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) student and the results of an intervention designed to address decoding and encoding skills. Results of the analyses suggest that the student lacked an understanding of how to decoding words by syllable type including closed syllables, syllables with silent -e, and vowel digraph syllables. Therefore, these skills were the target of a three-lesson intervention series, coupled with pre and post-tests to measure skill growth. Changes from pre to post-test suggest that ESL students benefit from learning syllable types as a way of understanding vowel sounds for the fluent decoding of multisyllabic words.

Developing Multisyllabic Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners mp4

Developing Multisyllabic Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Developing Multisyllabic Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Crystal A. Flores
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
The study presented features two Kindergarten students with similar needs in English Language Arts and a series of explicit intervention lessons targeted to help these students’ deficits. Before beginning intervention multiple assessments were administered in order to determine which areas seem to be the most difficult for these students. Once the assessments were examined it was determined that the featured students lack the skills of blending consonant-vowel-consonant words. The lack of this skill can affect their reading skills and keep them from being on-grade level with the rest of their peers. The changes found from their pre/post-tests show that with explicit instruction, ESL students can develop the skills that they may be lacking in the area of reading. 

Open and Closed - A Study of Multisyllabic Decoding for ESL Readers

Title of presentation: Open and Closed - A Study of Multisyllabic Decoding for ESL Readers
Presenter: Hannah E. Ray
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 1
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study presents a fifth-grade ESL literacy skills analysis and a three-lesson intervention aimed towards targeting areas of deficiency through an individualized and explicit instruction plan. At the beginning of this intervention process, the target student was assessed to ascertain the skills in which they were deficient, as well as determining their strengths. The results indicated that the ESL student showed weakness in specific areas of literacy that contrasted to the proficiency in literacy skills of native English speakers. This student demonstrated mastery of basic decoding skills but lacked the advanced skill of decoding multisyllabic words. When further assessed, it was revealed that the student was not proficient in decoding specific syllable types (open, closed, and consonant -le). Because of this, the three-lesson series focused on identifying and breaking apart these syllable types. Changes from the pretest to post-test show the im pact individualized and explicit reading skill instruction has on an ESL student’s language skills.

Multisyllabic Decoding for ESL Readers pdf

 

Room 2- FSU Undergraduate Education
Session Moderator - Dr. Elizabeth Crowe

Learning Syllables to Improve Decoding - an ESL Investigation in Literacy Skills

Title of presentation: Learning Syllables to Improve Decoding - an ESL Investigation in Literacy Skills
Presenter: Emily R. Cobb
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features two first grade students - a native English speaker who struggles with reading and an ESL (English as a Second Language) student. Initially, assessments were administered to determine the nature of literacy skills possessed by the struggling reader student and the ESL student. The ESL student featured in this case possessed nearly all basic decoding skills, in addition to some advanced decoding skills, while lacking continuity in their skill profile. Furthermore, the struggling reader student in this case demonstrated a comparable skill profile. The missing skills of the students pose challenges to their reading success and therefore these skills (closed, open, and r-controlled syllable types) were targeted for intervention within a three lesson series to promote good multisyllabic word reading skills. Changes from pre to post-test suggest that ESL students and struggling readers can acquire reading skills via explicit decoding instruction.

Roots of Reading - Developing Decoding Skills with Roots and Suffixes

Title of presentation: Roots of Reading - Developing Decoding Skills with Roots and Suffixes
Presenter: Naomi Machala
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features a sixth-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) literacy skills examination and an intervention sequence designed to address reading skill deficits through individualized, explicit instruction. Beforehand, assessments were conducted to determine the nature of literacy skills maintained by the student. The ESL student featured in this case possessed some basic and high-level decoding skills while lacking coherence in their skill profile. These missing skills present challenges to the reader and therefore these skills (multisyllabic word decoding and Greek and Latin affix knowledge) were targeted for intervention within a three three-lesson series. Improvements made from pre to post-test suggest that root and affix knowledge can improve the decoding skills of ESL students.

Foundational Reading Skill Development in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Foundational Reading Skill Development in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Lauren A Shuler 
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study is focused on an ESL kindergarten student who struggles with basic foundational reading skills. The study began with a skills assessment which was pivotal in determining which skills were mastered and which remained to be learned. Specifically, the student showed mastery in some alphabetic characters, but lacked a sufficient foundation for fluent blending and decoding. An intervention was designed to provide individualized instruction that also included accommodations for second language learners. Pre and post test results suggest that young ESL readers can learn to read when provided with explicit instruction that addresses needs and builds foundational skills.

Developing Vowel Digraph Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learner or Exceptional Student (ESE)

Title of presentation: Developing Vowel Digraph Decoding Skills in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learner or Exceptional Student (ESE)
Presenter: Isla G Forte
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Undergraduate Education

Abstract
This case study features two second-grade students, one of which is an ESL (English as a Second Language) student and one of which is an ESE (exceptional student education) student. Both the ELL and ESE students' literacy skills were analyzed and an intervention sequence designed to address reading skill deficits was created with three lesson plans where the students received individualized and explicit instruction on vowel digraphs. To begin, assessments were administered to determine the nature of the literacy skills possessed by the students. The skill profile results suggested that the ESL student demonstrates varying reading skill profiles, similar to other students in the class, but contrasts the vowel digraph decoding skills observed from native English-speakers. The ESE student demonstrated a very similar skillset with knowledge of basic decoding skills, however, his skills also contrast with the other students’ vowel digraph decoding skills. These missing skills pose challenges to their reading success, therefore, this skill was targeted for intervention with the three-lesson series. Changes from pre to post-test suggests that ESL and ESE students can acquire reading skills via explicit decoding instruction, though specific accommodations and support are necessary.

Expanding upon Short-Vowel Sounds, including Blending and Encoding in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners

Title of presentation: Expanding upon Short-Vowel Sounds, including Blending and Encoding in English as a Second Language (ESL) Learners
Presenter: Adreian Savannah
Advisor: Dr. Elizabeth Crowe
Location: Room 2
Time: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CT

Category: FSU PC Graduate Education

Abstract:
This case study focuses on the literacy skills of a second-grade ESL (English as a Second Language) student. Preliminary assessments identified short vowels and ending sounds as deficit skill areas in need of intervention. These skills were the focus of a three-lesson sequence that incorporated decoding and encoding skills as a way to practice and develop word reading fluency. Post-test results suggest that students can benefit from individualizing decoding instruction that takes their ESL-specific language needs into account.

Expanding upon Short-Vowel Sounds pdf

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